May 19, 2024
Four years ago the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) underwent a name change in hopes of signifying a change in thinking in the region. The new name, United States Indo-Pacific Command (USINDOPACOM), was in recognition of "the increasing connectivity between the Indian and Pacific oceans as America focuses West." In studying the region it quickly becomes clear that India, and particularly Indian naval strategy must be examined to understand the dynamics of the situation. A BETTER PEACE welcomes back Patrick Bratton to share his studies of Kavalam Madhava Panikkar, an Indian scholar statesman and the author of among dozens of other works, India and the Indian Ocean: An Essay on the Influence of Sea Power on Indian History. Patrick joins podcast editor Ron Granieri in the studio to look at the life and works of Panikkar and how India's first ambassador to China has lessons to offer to anyone interested in understanding INDOPACOM.

Four years ago the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) underwent a name change in hopes of signifying a change in thinking in the region. The new name, United States Indo-Pacific Command (USINDOPACOM), was in recognition of “the increasing connectivity between the Indian and Pacific oceans as America focuses West.” In studying the region it quickly becomes clear that India, and particularly Indian naval strategy must be examined to understand the dynamics of the situation. A BETTER PEACE welcomes back Patrick Bratton to share his studies of Kavalam Madhava Panikkar, an Indian scholar statesman and the author of among dozens of other works, India and the Indian Ocean: An Essay on the Influence of Sea Power on Indian History. Patrick joins podcast editor Ron Granieri in the studio to look at the life and works of Panikkar and how India’s first ambassador to China has lessons to offer to anyone interested in understanding INDOPACOM.

So nowadays the Indian foreign policy establishment often talks about sort of strategic autonomy and that we were friends to all, enemies to none. And so one thing that you’ll often have is Indian diplomats very proudly say we’re going to be very good relations with you the United States…but we’re also going to have a good relationship with Russia and we want to have a good relationship with Iran and we want to have a good relationship with Israel.

Patrick Bratton is Associate Professor of National Security and Strategy Studies, the Halsey Chair of Naval Strategy, and the head of the South Asia Asia regional studies program at the U.S. Army War College. He specializes in Indian foreign and security policy and maritime issues

Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE.

The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense.

Photo Description: INDIAN OCEAN (April 16, 2012) – Indian navy ships transits the Indian Ocean during an exercise for Malabar 2012. Malabar is a regularly scheduled naval field training exercise conducted to advance multinational maritime relationships and mutual security.

Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Farrington/Released, Panikkar inset courtesy of cic.gov.in

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