CONSERVATIVE VS. BOLD THINKING IN SPACEPOWER THEORY?

Two main approaches are emerging in spacepower theorizing. A conservative approach acknowledges space as a distinct physical domain, but mostly treats it conceptually as an extension of the air domain. A bolder approach projects spacepower out to moon and eventually beyond, and envisions decisive strategic advantage to whomever can dominate space. WAR ROOM welcomes Leon Perkowski to offer a way forward. He suggests both should be examined closely and with the humility learned from early airpower and nuclear deterrence theorizing lest we drive toward pitfalls we could have anticipated.

“TECHNOCRATS AND OPERATIONAL EXPERTS” (DUSTY SHELVES)

Murray…highlights the German military’s failure as a whole to understand how the Industrial Revolution had transformed warfighting. Written histories, it is said, speak to each generation differently, enabling readers to interpret them within the framework of their own experiences. As such, a rereading of Williamson Murray’s Luftwaffe—first published in 1985—is especially timely. Although offering more […]

JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)

The great benefit of looking at John Warden’s system is that it [employed] effects-based objectives [for] attacking an enemy A BETTER PEACE continues the Great Strategists series with a look at the systems-based theory of John Warden III, Colonel, U.S. Air Force retired. Out of the emerging theories of airpower and his own experiences in […]

JOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)

The OODA loop kinda represents how … humans and organizations learn, grow, and survive A BETTER PEACE continues its series on Great Strategists with a look at airpower theorist John Boyd, who conceived of the “OODA” (Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act) Loop. Originally expressing an approach to tactical engagement, Boyd later expanded the idea to […]

THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS

They saw airplanes … come into reality as weapon systems … and they became strong advocates. We continue our Great Strategists series with a look at three pioneers of airpower — Giulio Douhet from the Italian Armed Forces, Billy Mitchell of the U.S., and Hugh Trenchard, the “father” of the British Royal Air Force. In […]

WHY AN AIR FORCE? TOWARD NEW THINKING ON SERVICE ARCHITECTURE

War Room welcomes Dr. Rob Farley, author of Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force, to discuss and critique the National Security Act of 1947 which included the establishment of an independent Air Force. Was it wise to separate the Air Force from the Army and pursue an unrealized promise of airpower solving national security problems on its own? Is the interservice rivalry that followed more destructive than helpful – and did the Goldwater-Nichols Act do enough to mitigate it? What can one learn from the establishment of an independent air force when considering new or emerging domains such as space or cyber? These and other questions are debated under the moderation of Dr. Mark Duckenfield, Chair of the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College.